Summer 1989 • Vol. XI No. 3 Fiction |

In Which John Imagines His Mind as a Pond

When John woke in the morning he was thinking of Ann: the earnest look on her face when she asked him how he was getting along, her silence at the dinner table, her attention to the children. She grinned when jokes were made, looked pensive when the talk was serious. She was married to Graham. He wrote articles on international economics, and when John's wife said she had a friend who was also an economist, Graham said, "Oh yes, I've met him. He wishes he were me." Ann didn't seem embarrassed. John thought she treated Graham as if he were her guest, someone she respected but didn't know well. He hadn't seen her beauty at first. Her shoulders tipped forward, and you could see how she would look when she was old: crooked, bony, in need of a cane. She wore her hair frizzed and electric from a perm, or limp and clinging to her face, or sometimes, short and spikey on the top with a long braid down her back. John's wife thought Ann couldn't make up her mind about how to presen

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Elena

By Devon Jersild

When John woke in the morning he was thinking of Ann: the earnest look on her face when she asked him how he was getting along, her silence at the […]

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