Summer 1987 • Vol. IX No. 3 Personally Speaking |

Teaching Homer in the Shadow of Troy

Lying there half asleep in the brightly lit cabin, I was startled by the muffled announcement over the loudspeaker in the ship's passageway. "Kalymnos," it called. "Passengers for Kalymnos please proceed to the cargo deck." My wife and I hurriedly gathered our belongings and stumbled out of our cabin, down the dank passageway to the stairs leading deep into the hull of the ship. It was three-thirty in the morning. We had left Piraeus fifteen hours earlier, watched as we sailed past Cape Sounion, gray and rain soaked, read and rested during the afternoon and early evening, then rushed on deck to glimpse the lights of Patmos at midnight, as we entered its tiny harbor. Now we sleepily descended the stairs to the cargo deck of the Kamiros, about to dock at the island that would be our home for the next six months. In the semi-darkness of the cavernous hold of the ship, we were surprised by the animated scene that greeted us. Perhaps a hundred people had gathered to debark. As the

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In Memorium

By Galbraith M. Crump

Lying there half asleep in the brightly lit cabin, I was startled by the muffled announcement over the loudspeaker in the ship's passageway. "Kalymnos," it called. "Passengers for Kalymnos please […]

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