Summer 1983 • Vol. V No. 3 Editor's NotesJuly 1, 1983 |

Editorial: New Words for Old

This issue of The Kenyon Review marks a new beginning, at least the fourth since the journal's inception in 1939. Such beginnings are natural to the basic metabolism of all life and its multitudinous enterprises. Biologists assure us that the cell changes occurring daily and almost imperceptibly in our bodies bring about in the course of time a completely new being, if not a new person. In the process, we learn, about every seven years our old bodies have been completely sloughed off, replaced entirely by new tissue. Yet even as this change emerges, at what the ancients called a climacteric, so the process begins again. In fact, there never is a beginning or an end, as long as life persists. Between being and becoming there can be no detente. We never do step into the same stream twice. The passing waters chill even as they invigorate. All nature shows us it could not be otherwise. Every beginning, whether biological or editorial, mediates between the directives of the past and

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In Memorium

By Galbraith M. Crump

This issue of The Kenyon Review marks a new beginning, at least the fourth since the journal's inception in 1939. Such beginnings are natural to the basic metabolism of all […]

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