Summer 1980 • Vol. II No. 3 PoetryJuly 1, 1980 |

Wolves

Freud's famous 'Wolf-Man" case is a history of a childhood nightmare: its sources in fairy tale and the experience of the primal scene, witnessed by Freud's patient, an exiled Russian nobleman living in Vienna. Freud left Vienna in 1938 and died in London in September, 1939. The "Wolf-Man" remained in Vienna through the war and lived to write his autobiography. Ⅰ The Wolf Dream Outside the window, a tree looms with five white wolves. The window flies open. The child is suddenly awake though he sleeps, dreaming white wolves on snow, in a grey forest of fears. Later he will narrate his fears: the broken walnut tree at Christmas, spread with white bedclothes, hung not with gifts but wolves, while he dreams he must lie awake forever, a feverish child doomed to be always the child hiding in the man, the man in his fears. Nightly, yearly they come. Awake: on the glass the dry finger of the tree scratches and summons. Here are the wolves, your parents, your loves. The hot sheets are

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Freud's famous 'Wolf-Man" case is a history of a childhood nightmare: its sources in fairy tale and the experience of the primal scene, witnessed by Freud's patient, an exiled Russian […]

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