Summer 1979 • Vol. I No. 3 Poetry |

The Dancing at Tillai

The Night This is Kālī's day the woman in my sleep said This is Kālī's day     O Mother please please Mother children weep let it not be till tomorrow the little children say There is a woman drumming until the drumhead breaks until the maiden wakes and sees the coming day. Mother takes the fear away. Night is Kālīthe god appears between her thighs stands in beauty, dances, dies.      O Mother, comfort me. Śiva and Kama Look up, look out! Desire comes to adore you, over the April meadow. White, white his flesh is, silver his laughter. Uncover your third eye, burn him to ashes that he may cast no shadow being with you and before you hereafter and forever. Epiphany Did you hear? Mrs Le Guin has found God. Yes, but she found the wrong one. Absolutely typical. Look, there they go together. Mercy! It's a colored woman! Yes, it's one of those relationships. They call her Mama Linga. Why does Jesus always

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Ursula K. Le Guin (1929-2018) was the author of numerous novels, volumes of short stories, collections of essays, books for children, volumes of poetry and translation, and received many honors and awards including Hugo, Nebula, National Book Award, PEN-Malamud.

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By Ursula K. Le Guin

The Night This is Kālī's day the woman in my sleep said This is Kālī's day     O Mother please please Mother children weep let it not be till tomorrow the […]

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