Summer 1965 • Vol. XXVII No. 3 Reviews: Dickens and Some Others: Special Review Section |

The Motorcycle

THE MOTORCYCLE by André Pieyre de Mandiargues. Translated by Richard Howard. Grove Press, $3.95. In these days of often exacerbated eroticism in fiction, it may not seem a very promising recommendation for a novel to link it with Lady Chatterley's Lover. This rather facile connection, quoted on the jacket of The Motorcycle, is emphasized by the crudely sexual illustration—chosen, it would seem, to titillate adolescent imaginations. Yet, erotic though it is, Mandiargues' book is surely not adolescent. Just as deliberately as he did in The Girl beneath the Lion, Mandiargues keeps a firm controlling hand over the sensuous sug- gestiveness of the scenes described here. Though it clearly embodies a dream fantasy in the surrealist vein, an erotic mood and imaginary fulfilment, the novel is held at a distance: objective, precise, sharply etched in its strangeness. Mandiargues succeeds in establishing that distance by weaving into his tale the strands of myth, but a myth presented wi

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Three French Poets

By Germaine Brée

THE MOTORCYCLE by André Pieyre de Mandiargues. Translated by Richard Howard. Grove Press, $3.95. In these days of often exacerbated eroticism in fiction, it may not seem a very promising […]

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