Summer 1965 • Vol. XXVII No. 3 Reviews: Dickens and Some Others: Special Review SectionJuly 1, 1965 |

The Convert and the Heretic

LOVE AND REVOLUTION: MY JOURNEY THROUGH AN EPOCH by Max Eastman. Random House, $8.95. William James begins his chapter on conversion in The Varieties of Religious Experience by remarking that it is the process by which a self divided becomes unified. There is too large a philosophical distance between the reasonableness of his argument and the experience it tries to define. We cannot afford to indulge our rationality, for conversion is not so exotic in our world as it was in his. For him it expressed the nature of religion; for us it must express that of politics. There is a further difference: we have discovered that beyond conversion lies recantation. The political confession has now become a genre, if not an avocation. For that reason we should not demand the wrong things of it. A genre is a habit as well as a form of art, and it is as good to know about one as the other. Yet I think many reviewers of Eastman's Love and Revolution have done to the author what Macaulay did

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Myth or Criticism

By Ronald Berman

LOVE AND REVOLUTION: MY JOURNEY THROUGH AN EPOCH by Max Eastman. Random House, $8.95. William James begins his chapter on conversion in The Varieties of Religious Experience by remarking that […]

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