Summer 1962 • Vol. XXIV No. 3 Nonfiction |

The General, the Poet, and the Inquisition

I've had it. Familiar idiom: post-1940 "Tired" Pearl Bailey song hit: 1945 Nixon or Kennedy: Does It Make Ainy Difference? Title of political pamphlet: 1960 "Why not," we wondered as we scanned the displays of closet accessories, sewing needs, hair-grooming aids, girdles, slippers, scuffs and wraps, rainwear, beachwear and sunglasses, and a disparate lot of items lumped together as novelties at the Midyear National Notion and Novelty Show in the New York Trade Show Building the other day, "why not try to turn the thoughts of the world from the space race and the missile hustle to the power for peace of notions and novelties?" And why not? "The Talk of the Town," The New Yorker: 1961 IN THE EARLY DECADES OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY, SAYS THE historian G. M. Young, England became "in spirit suburban." Defining the latter phrase Young trims off various connotations of the term "suburban," presumably in order to avoid attacks from positivists or others who

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A Month in Summer

By Carolyn Kizer

I've had it. Familiar idiom: post-1940 "Tired" Pearl Bailey song hit: 1945 Nixon or Kennedy: Does It Make Ainy Difference? Title of political pamphlet: 1960 "Why not," we wondered as […]

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