Summer 1960 • Vol. XXII No. 3 Nonfiction |

Two Brechtians

Some fifteen months have elapsed since my last American article on Brecht was published.* Since then two new books on Brecht have appeared in England and the U.S.A.—John Willett's The Theatre of Bertolt Brecht (Methuen, London, 1959; New Directions, New York, 1959) and Martin Esslin's Brecht: A Choice of Evils (Eyre & Spottiswoode, London, I960), re-edited with additional material under the American title Brecht: The Man and his Work (Doubleday, New York, 1960). Both are books of exceptional merit—Willett's mainly notable for the mass of historical data assembled to document literary and theatrical influences upon Brecht's work; Esslin's, for a daring and ambitious coup d'essai linking Marxist and Freudian dialectics in a two-pronged attack on the ambiguities in Brecht's work. Both books plainly owe a massive debt to the communist critic Ernst Schumacher (Die dramatischen Versuche Bertolt Brechts, Rütten & Loening, Berlin, 1955) and a lesser one to Volker Klotz's st

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Standpoint

By Editors

Some fifteen months have elapsed since my last American article on Brecht was published.* Since then two new books on Brecht have appeared in England and the U.S.A.—John Willett's The […]

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