Summer 1960 • Vol. XXII No. 3 Book ReviewsJuly 1, 1960 |

Mink Agonistes

The Mansion by William Faulkner. Random House. $4.75. The Mansion is divided into three parts: "Mink," "Linda," and "Flem" It begins in media res, with Mink's thoughts as the jury says "Guilty" and the Judge says "Life." Unlike Gavin Stevens, V. K. Ratliff and Charles Mallison, who between them tell the rest of the story, Mink is not allowed to speak for himself—Faulkner presumably having learnt his lesson from the Benjy experiment in The Sound and the Fury. At any rate, by reporting Mink's thoughts and actions Faulkner retains the privilege of using his own words instead of limiting himself to those of an illiterate dirt farmer. The result is strangely compelling except for certain lapses in that Faulknerian rhetorical style (which had its high point in Absalom, Absalom). In these places it simply looks like a good style gone to seed. The incident in "The Long Summer" section of The Hamlet in which Mink kills Jack Houston for impounding his cow is re-told with considerabl

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Dylan Thomas

By Geoffrey Moore

The Mansion by William Faulkner. Random House. $4.75. The Mansion is divided into three parts: "Mink," "Linda," and "Flem" It begins in media res, with Mink's thoughts as the jury […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.