Summer 1957 • Vol. XIX No. 3 FictionJuly 1, 1957 |

A Delayed Hearing

Miss Mindhart's taste in personal adornment, Mrs. Haxton's taste in religions, these may be said to have done the damage. Miss Mindenhart, a large, greying woman who may once have been statuesque but now was merely dumpy on the grand scale, affected ornaments of a style to match: brooches big as saucers, ear-rings which reminded you of doorknobs and alarmingly had stretched her lobes; and especially to the point of this story, a handbag which she now carried, whose clasp came in the form of a huge silver or chromium arrow serving also as a handle and extending, feathers and tip, a goodish way beyond the limits of the bag itself, which was not tiny. Great is Diana of the Ephesians, and great was Miss Mindenhart; whereas Mrs. Haxton was a small, slender woman, likewise greying, with soft, large, brown eyes, an appealingly wistful or martyred expression, but (as everyone knew) a shrewish temper and stubborn will, qualities she was at present seeking to allay by the study of Indian reli

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Tradition

By Howard Nemerov

Miss Mindhart's taste in personal adornment, Mrs. Haxton's taste in religions, these may be said to have done the damage. Miss Mindenhart, a large, greying woman who may once have […]

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