Summer 1955 • Vol. XVII No. 3 Nonfiction |

Don Perlimplin: Lorca’s Theatre-Poetry

For something like forty years poets in English-speaking countries have been trying to write poetic drama for the modern stage. This movement, if something so scattered and diverse may be called a movement, stems largely from Yeats and Eliot. Their plays are still the best modern poetic drama we have, and their theories still define the prevailing conception of poetic drama. But no one is quite satisfied with the results. We still lack a poetic theatre-form comparable to those of more fortunate ages, or to the "unpoetic" convention of modern realism. Poetic drama in English remains unsure of itself, highbrow and cultish—unless Elizabeth the Queen, Venus Observed, and The Cocktail Party, which are fairly well accepted in the show-shops, are to be called poetic drama. Federico García Lorca also wrote poetic drama, very much as Yeats and Eliot have taught us to understand it, yet his plays are neither cultish nor middlebrow-Ersatz: they are theatre-poetry which lives naturally o

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The Human Image¹

By Francis Fergusson

For something like forty years poets in English-speaking countries have been trying to write poetic drama for the modern stage. This movement, if something so scattered and diverse may be […]

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