Summer 1954 • Vol. XVI No. 3 NonfictionJuly 1, 1954 |

Movie Note: The 3-D’s

The received idea has long been that the movies, because of their photographic nature, tend to make "unreality," the fictive premise, seem "real"; as a way of making the verbally proposed Scarlett O'Hara take on the snapshot look of Vivien Leigh in an old-fashioned dress, there is validity to the assumption. Remember that Frankenstein's monster was a musty old melodrama in obscure print till the movies began exploiting the theme with pictures of moving actors. Certainly, stage and cinema are the arts which require the least active mental cooperation from the witness and in this regard all sense of conviction comes more easily to him. The image does not have to be gathered from the significatory page: it is literally present; the spoken word does not have to be translated to his inner ear: it is addressed directly to his actual ear. At the same time that the new "third dimension" in cinema makes the photograph more like nature, and hence a likelier candidate for the spectator's vicar

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Lust for Lifelikeness

By Parker Tyler

The received idea has long been that the movies, because of their photographic nature, tend to make "unreality," the fictive premise, seem "real"; as a way of making the verbally […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.