Summer 1950 • Vol. XII No. 3 Book ReviewsJuly 1, 1950 |

New Masks for Old

Sophocles, Oedipus Rex translated by Dudley Fitts and Robert Fitzgerald. Harcourt, Brace. $2.50. The Medea Of Euripides translated by Rex Warner. Chanticleer Press. $1.75. The Prometheus Bound Of Aeschylus translated by Rex Warner. Chanticleer Press. $1.75.   Greek tragedy has continued to merit the attention of intelligent readers through centuries of changing tastes and interests because its crystalline concentration admits of numerous elaborations, each true to a degree, each implicit in the words of the poets. Epigoni from the Roman to the current renascence have variously seen in Greek tragedy an edifying display of human capacity for agonized passion, intense emotion under social control, criticism of religious or political orthodoxies, investigation of the workings of abnormal psychology or of the collective unconscious, religious antiquarianism. All can claim justification on the basis of one aspect or another of the surviving plays, and the unprejudiced observer ca

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Naturalized Virgil, Alien Greeks

By Moses Hadas

Sophocles, Oedipus Rex translated by Dudley Fitts and Robert Fitzgerald. Harcourt, Brace. $2.50. The Medea Of Euripides translated by Rex Warner. Chanticleer Press. $1.75. The Prometheus Bound Of Aeschylus translated […]

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