Summer 1949 • Vol. XI No. 3 Book Reviews |

Aristocracy and/or Christianity

Notes Towards The Definition Of Culture by T. S. Eliot. Harcourt. $2.50 One first and natural question might be: What has happened to Eliot's prose? The process, of course, has been going on for some time, and this book is no sudden lapse from its last predecessor; but one sees here what looks like the end of a process, if one compares this to a previous, very brief, but perhaps more important pronouncement on culture: the essay on Marie Lloyd (1923). The syntax of single sentences may be more precise, but the movement from sentence to sentence within the paragraph hardly exists: the concision, vigor, and crackle of the early essays is gone. There is now something cut up and pasted together about this style: it never flows. One imagines the book put together as a series of letters to the Church Times; and if one did not know the author, one might imagine him as some fastidious, very literate and sorrowfully exacerbated vicar writing from the fastness of his parish study somewher

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A Master of Irony

By William Barrett

Notes Towards The Definition Of Culture by T. S. Eliot. Harcourt. $2.50 One first and natural question might be: What has happened to Eliot's prose? The process, of course, has […]

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