Summer 1948 • Vol. X No. 3 NonfictionJuly 1, 1948 |

The Meaning of Robert Penn Warren’s Novels

If an author makes a deep impression there comes a time when you are no longer content merely to read his books as they come out. You want to re-read him. You want to know what the body of his writing amounts to. Today for instance, many people must be feeling an interest in the whole body of Robert Penn Warren's writings—not, I hope, because Warren has recently become famous but because one increasingly has the impression that he is the most considerable American writer to emerge since the 'twenties. As far as recent discussion of Warren is concerned, one's inquisitiveness is sharpened, not by the hullabaloo, but by the strange lack of accord as to the ideas he presents. What has Warren been saying to us? In this sketch of Warren's achievement as a novelist, I shall have that question chiefly in mind. Which is not in the least to imply that it is the most important question that could be asked about him. I. A convenient point of departure is a meditation on Shakespeare th

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By Eric Bentley

If an author makes a deep impression there comes a time when you are no longer content merely to read his books as they come out. You want to re-read […]

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