Summer 1947 • Vol. IX No. 3 Nonfiction |

Two More Existentialists: Karl Jaspers and Gabriel Marcel

The storm around existentialism rages mostly about Sartre and the French atheistic school — of whom even Heidegger is said to have said, "Mein Gott! Das hab' ich nicht gewollt!" But on the periphery of the movement are writers — apart even from the Barthian theological heirs of Kierkegaard — for whom God has not yet died, and for whom, moreover, even the loneliness of the Kierkegaardian self is, at least ostensibly, conquered by the discovery of immediate communication between selves. So, it seems, the stress on personal existence may serve the lonely vision of God, as in Soren Kierkegaard; or it may stem from the denial of God, but issue in a self equally solitary, as in Sartre or Heidegger. Or it may, as in the Protestant Karl Jaspers or the Catholic Gabriel Marcel, involve a recognition both of faith in God and of direct communication with other finite selves as necessary elements in personal existence itself. The only permutation I have not seen stated is an existential ph

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The Philosophy

By Marjorie Grene

The storm around existentialism rages mostly about Sartre and the French atheistic school — of whom even Heidegger is said to have said, "Mein Gott! Das hab' ich nicht gewollt!" […]

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