Summer 1947 • Vol. IX No. 3 Nonfiction |

Movie Letter: Charlie Verdoux

After Sarah Bernhardt, no artist in any medium has received so much expertly qualified adulation in the last hundred years as Charlie Chaplin, and doubtless Chaplin has been more universally appreciated than anyone. There was an element of perfectedness in his clown, of pure clean organic inspiration, which triumphed in the eyes of all spectators; intellectuals almost unfailingly enjoyed it and it struck an unstinted response from such hermetic artists and dogmatists as the Dadaists and Surrealists. Every conceivable nuance of aesthetic reaction and every verbal convention of criticism has certainly, at one time or another, in one language or another, been bestowed on Chaplin's art. Not even the cinematic genius of Griffith's early films was so absolute and invulnerable as Chaplin's first screen comedies. It was not merely that Charlie had created an authentic clown of world stature ― a clown whose genius was recognizable even in flat silhouette ― but that he immediately create

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Lust for Lifelikeness

By Parker Tyler

After Sarah Bernhardt, no artist in any medium has received so much expertly qualified adulation in the last hundred years as Charlie Chaplin, and doubtless Chaplin has been more universally […]

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