Summer 1946 • Vol. VIII No. 3 FictionJuly 1, 1946 |

The New Egypt

The Great Event After centuries, or centuries of centuries, mankind had at last achieved immortality. This great event of our history—but it is ridiculous to speak of it as such, for with this achievement our history, as we understand it, came to an end. How, then, shall we refer to it? In The Statistical Tables, one of the last great books of prophecy, attributed, without much certainty, to Gorelik, an actuary, it is written: "Men shall huddle together as about a dying fire: even the warmth of it shall be feeble. They shall repent in their hearts all the ages of evil, even while ashes fall from the sky. For the sun shall be burned out. And men, beholding it, shall say, 'Lo, the sun is fallen. Let us repent as we give up the ghost.’” This prophetic work enjoys the distinction of having been proved entirely wrong. The sun did not burn out and men did not give up the ghost; indeed, they ceased doing so altogether. The date of the last recorded death is known. Therefore one

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