Summer 1945 • Vol. VII No. 3 CommunicationsJuly 1, 1945 |

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Sirs: Miss Udren has supplied valuable points omitted from my review concerning the surface meanings and conscious moral intentions of Road to the Ocean. But the literary question, still unanswered, is that of Leonov’s ambivalence: the clash between intellect and feeling which appears to cause unwilling distortions in the form. Perhaps it was not clear that the many "inversions” of Soviet ideals seemed to be unintentional, involuntary: tricks played by an artist’s sensibility against his convictions. The key may lie in Miss Udren’s observation that "Leonov sees himself as a mute sacrifice. Amidst the savagery accompanying the birth of a new world, he is as isolated as the prodigal son of . . . Invasion.” This is a moral question. Again, the literary question is: what kind of a sacrifice in artistic values does a writer make whose intellect somewhat unwillingly defends the new world, while his sensibility somewhat unwillingly denounces it? This I tried to answer by po

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Some Culled Fictions

By Marjorie Farber

Sirs: Miss Udren has supplied valuable points omitted from my review concerning the surface meanings and conscious moral intentions of Road to the Ocean. But the literary question, still unanswered, […]

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