Summer 1945 • Vol. VII No. 3 Nonfiction |

Arabesque in Verse (Reconsiderations III)

(RECONSIDERATIONS III) The appearance of Fiske Kimball's authoritative book on The Creation of the Rococo may be as significant for the critic of literature as for the critic of the fine arts. By his meticulous survey of the rococo Mr. Kimball has not only brought order among some reckless opinions about that decorative style, but has also afforded the possibility of discerning more clearly what the verse of Alexander Pope represents. This possibility comes fortunately because of the renewed concern with Pope, who wrote a sort of poetry very rare in England and who has never been "placed”— he is considered merely a talented versifier, an exquisite designer in filigree; or he is an inhibited "romantic” with his "passion” and his response to "nature”; or he is a vessel of petty spites—or else an ardent moralist; or—very recently—he is a kind of "metaphysical poet” with an ironic recognition of the "total situation.” Furthermore, he is to be judged not by The Rap

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Gide’s Cubist Novel

By Wylie Sypher

(RECONSIDERATIONS III) The appearance of Fiske Kimball's authoritative book on The Creation of the Rococo may be as significant for the critic of literature as for the critic of the […]

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