Summer 1944 • Vol. VI No. 3 Book Reviews |

The Aesthetic and the Ethical

Either/Or by Soren Kierkegaard. Vol. I translated by D. F. Swenson and L. M. Swenson; Vol II translated by W. Lowrie. Princeton University Press. $7.50. In his Journals, Kierkegaard compared himself to an Alcibiades who after seeking in vain for a Socrates to be his teacher, prayed to the gods to transform him into such a Socrates. His commentators have been prompt to add that he became his own Plato as well. And to round out the metaphor properly, one must telescope 800 years and say that he was also his Ambrose and Simplicianus. After Plato, Kierkegaard is probably the philosophic thinker with the greatest sensitivity to the problem of the proper literary structure for philosophical discourse. The literary structure employed by a genuine philosopher in his writings is inevitably the formalization, the per-fectioning, of the everyday situation in which he finds conscious thought and dialectic occurring: thus the Platonic dialogue is an imitation of conversations occurring on

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The Blood of a Poet

By C. G. Wallis

Either/Or by Soren Kierkegaard. Vol. I translated by D. F. Swenson and L. M. Swenson; Vol II translated by W. Lowrie. Princeton University Press. $7.50. In his Journals, Kierkegaard compared […]

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