Summer 1941 • Vol. III No. 3 Book Reviews |

More Directions

NEW DIRECTIONS 1940. Edited by James Laughlin. New Directions. $3.50. Mr. Laughlin's new collection is larger and handsomer than its predecessors, and he says in the preface that he has paid special attention this time to "instinctive" form and discipline, but the general character of New Directions has not changed: a few solid excellent pieces, many lame ducks, some aimless experiment, a few freaks. New features are a long section on Surrealism and the absence of any really good verse. I propose to begin with the lame ducks, since reviewers commonly ignore them and Mr. Laughlin with a touching but reprehensible loyalty has been printing them or their stand-ins for years. The worst poetry, then, and it is excruciating, is by Charles Henri Ford, Paul Goodman, Eugene Jolas, Hubert Creekmore and George Kauffman. Terrible also are the "chain-poems" written by the Vou Club, the New Apocalypse Group, and other misguided persons. The prose is better than the poetry. Only Parker Tyler's

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In 1945, John Berryman won an early KR contest for short fiction, cosponsored by Doubleday, Doran & Co. Berryman achieved his greatest renown as a poet with the publication of 77 Dream Songs in 1964, which won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.

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