Sept/Oct 2019 • Vol. XLI No. 5 |

Finding a Drawer Full of Drivers’ Licenses:

Read Guest Poetry Editor Natalie Shapero’s essay “Why We Chose It” here. The Golden State Killer stole “trophies” from his victims such as flatware, jewelry, photographs, and drivers’ licenses. Twenty years after his crime spree had stopped, police began to release lists of the items in hopes that someone—a family member, a home health aide, etc.—would recognize an item and report the owner, who would then be in his 80s. In a statement to the public, a detective said, “If you find a drawer full of drivers’ licenses at your uncle’s house, call us.” All expired. Mostly women, in their 30s when the photos were taken. Now they’d be in their 60s and 70s. A few men frowning under uneven mustaches. Some faces scratched out to white blurs in the plastic. How funny was fashion back then? Pointy collars wide as wind socks, all that argyle, hard hair, eyeglasses so thick—why, it’d be like peering out of the freezer through the narrowing window of ice. Back then

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Jennifer L. Knox is the author of four books of poems. The New York Times Book Review said her latest book, Days of Shame and Failure, “hits, with deceptive ease, all the poetic marks a reader could want: intellectual curiosity, emotional impact, beautiful language, surprising revelation and arresting imagery.” Her nonfiction writing has recently appeared in the Washington Post and the American Poetry Review. Her next book of poems, Crushing It, will be published by Copper Canyon.

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Twelve Words

By Brian Trapp

Read Guest Poetry Editor Natalie Shapero’s essay “Why We Chose It” here. The Golden State Killer stole “trophies” from his victims such as flatware, jewelry, photographs, and drivers’ licenses. Twenty […]

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