Jan/Feb 2017 • Vol. XXXIX No. 1 Poetry |

X

As you are both Malcolm's shadow & the black unknownhe died defending, I praise your untold potential, the possibleworlds you hold within your body'sbladed frame. I love how you stand in exultation, arms raised to welcome the rain, the bolt, whatever drops from the sky's slick shelf without warning, as all plagues do. Miracles too. & bombs that fall from planes, which hold men with eyes aimed through long glass tubes. Tubesthat make a civilian's life look small. Small enough to smoke. X marks the cross -hairs, & the home an explosion turns to blur. X marks the box on the form that bought the bombs, paid the trigger man, sent the senator's son off to schoolwithout a drop of blood to temperhis smile, stain leather boots, mar the occasion. X: every algorithm's heart -beat, how any & all adjacent quantities bloom. A kiss.How a signature knowswhere to begin its looping dance. Two hands balled into fists, crossed at the wrist, repping the boro

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Dr. Joshua Bennett is the author of The Sobbing School (Penguin, 2016), a National Poetry Series selection. He holds a Ph.D. in English from Princeton University, and an M.A. in Theatre and Performance Studies from the University of Warwick, where he was a Marshall Scholar. Dr. Bennett has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, Cave Canem, and the Ford Foundation. His writing has been published or is forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Boston Review, The New York Times, Poetry and elsewhere. He is currently a Junior Fellow in the Society of Fellows at Harvard University.

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Trash

By Joshua Bennett

As you are both Malcolm's shadow & the black unknownhe died defending, I praise your untold potential, the possibleworlds you hold within your body'sbladed frame. I love how you stand […]

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