Winter 2014 • Vol. XXXVI No. 1 Fiction |

The Favored Son

How did I get this hole through my hand? It's a bullet hole. Bullet went straight through the back of the hand and out of the palm. In and out. True. The evidence is there for you to see. You can poke your finger into the hole. It's sealed in the middle, but you can still tell. That happened twenty-five years ago. Yes, I'll tell you how. … I'd been wandering around the Southwest for a couple of years when I came across The Family. I should say right from the beginning that this was what they called themselves, and what they were known as in the tight-knit orchard town of Z. It wasn't a religious thing—well, they were religious—strict Catholics—but I mean, it wasn't like a cult or anything. They were all related—all close family—just part of what we might now call the cliché of the "hard-working Italian migrant family." Two generations who came out together in the late '50s and kids who were born in the early '60s and on. From scraps of land they built up orchards and

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.
John Kinsella
John Kinsella's recent books of poetry include Firebreaks (WW Norton, 2016), Jam Tree Gully (WW Norton, 2012) which won the Australian Prime Minister's Award for Poetry and the Judith Wright Calanthe Award, and Sack (Picador, UK, 2014). He is an Extraordinary Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge University and Professor of Literature and Environment at Curtin University.

Read More

The Diviners

By John Kinsella

How did I get this hole through my hand? It's a bullet hole. Bullet went straight through the back of the hand and out of the palm. In and out. […]

The Well

By John Kinsella

How did I get this hole through my hand? It's a bullet hole. Bullet went straight through the back of the hand and out of the palm. In and out. […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.