Winter 2014 • Vol. XXXVI No. 1 PoetryJanuary 1, 2014 |

In Which to Wonder Flew a Kind of Reckoning

So turned our backs to where woundable had come to mean therefore wounded. Stepped past bravery's blurred, curtains-in-a-wind façade. A birdlessness, and yet, from the trees everywhere, the smallest sounds. … As when, for example, the by-now-nearly-ritualized mistake of falling self-destructively and in relatively slow motion into then out of love seems to stop, a moment, all the slaughtered chances we convinced ourselves a life equaled, they suddenly fit in one hand, our mistakes mean nothing, the field lies down—it stammers in flames, before us …

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Carl Phillips
Carl Phillips is the author of thirteen books of poems, most recently Reconnaissance (FSG, 2015). He teaches at Washington University in St. Louis.

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Pale Colors in a Tall Field

By Carl Phillips

So turned our backs to where woundable had come to mean therefore wounded. Stepped past bravery's blurred, curtains-in-a-wind façade. A birdlessness, and yet, from the trees everywhere, the smallest sounds. … As […]

So the Edge of the World

By Carl Phillips

So turned our backs to where woundable had come to mean therefore wounded. Stepped past bravery's blurred, curtains-in-a-wind façade. A birdlessness, and yet, from the trees everywhere, the smallest sounds. … As […]

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