Winter 2013 • Vol. XXXV No. 1 2012 Kenyon Review Short Fiction Prize |

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2012 Kenyon Review Short Fiction Contest Runner-up   Mostly he shrieked endlessly in the sticky Karachi heat or when a bomb went off, and in those moments Zainab fantasized about dangling him up by his tiny pink feet, still soft and wrinkly at age three, and smashing his brains out against the garden wall or suffocating him with a pillow. Occasionally her thoughts were less violent, involving driving around the corner to the beach to leave him in their filthy stretch of the Arabian Sea or abandoning him in the deserted imported-cosmetics aisle of the yawning French supermarket across from the Cinnabon in the new mall down the road that was designed to lull Pakistan's frightened wealthy into the illusion that their lives met some standard of global normality. In reality her imaginings translated into little more than periods of sweet separation from her child that she stretched as long as possible, sometimes up to five or seven or ten hours, while she ordered one treatment af

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Madiha Sattar grew up in Karachi, is now based in Dubai and has lived in New York City and Cambridge, MA, where she studied History & Literature at Harvard University. Her fiction is forthcoming in Guernica and Glimmer Train and has appeared in The Life's Too Short Review, a journal of Pakistani writing. As a journalist she covered politics, security and US foreign policy in South Asia, and her reporting and other nonfiction have appeared in The Economist, Foreign Policy online, The Caravan and elsewhere. She can be found at www.madihasattar.com and @madihasattar.

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2012 Kenyon Review Short Fiction Contest Runner-up   Mostly he shrieked endlessly in the sticky Karachi heat or when a bomb went off, and in those moments Zainab fantasized about […]

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