Winter 2013 • Vol. XXXV No. 1 Fiction |

Demolition

1 The deaf man came to our church the first Sunday in Lent. A teenaged boy, wearing khaki pants and a bow tie, entered the sanctuary with him. They sat in the front pew. From behind we could see the bald spot on the man's crown, dark strands of hair slicked across. The boy was a foot taller than the man, with a wizened face and blond hair. We assumed they were father and son. Of course we couldn't tell the man was deaf—not at first—though we did notice the riveted attitude in which he sat, waiting for the service, head tilted back and tipped sideways as if discerning a far-off melody. When the organ prelude began, the boy lifted his hands and began to wave them back and forth. Immediately the man did the same. Thinking our visitors were of the charismatic persuasion (it was our custom to tolerate this kind of demonstrative worship, though we couldn't imagine our organist ever moving us to such displays), we grew uncomfortable and averted our eyes. But when Don Holdings st

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Jamie Quatro
Jamie Quatro is the author of the story collection I Want To Show You More (Grove, 2013) and the forthcoming novel Fire Sermon (Grove/Picador, 2018). She lives in Lookout Mountain, Georgia.

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