Winter 2012 • Vol. XXXIV No. 1 FictionJanuary 1, 2012 |

The Rising Girl

  After Dino Buzzati Matilda was tall. Feet big and attentive as wolfhounds, flattening the groomed grass in front of the skyscraper, she peered into a third-story window then looked at the sky shining shamelessly above her, so cloudless it made her totter. The sun was somewhere in full bloom, incendiary petals wavering, and she sometimes thought it would be a reassuring darkness, to lose her eyes to an indelible light, but she stared instead at her feet, which as far as she knew had never blinded anyone. Matilda threw her gaze across the improbable state of Kansas as though she were scattering morning mash among the chickens, and what she saw were autumn fields, long fallow, awaiting a corroborating frost; a vandalized church, bits of colored glass winking beneath the windows like candy, where the sound of the spirit had once hummed with enough vigor to interfere with the nighttime navigation of planes; winter-rusted trucks, cars dragging exhaust pipes like sullen animal

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Kellie Wells was awarded the Flannery O'Connor Award and the Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award for her collection of short fiction, Compression Scars. She is the recipient of the Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award for emerging women writers. “Digesting the Father” is an excerpt from her novel Skin, forthcoming in 2006 from the University of Nebraska Press. She teaches in the creative writing program at Washington University in St. Louis.

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Digesting the Father

By Kellie Wells

  After Dino Buzzati Matilda was tall. Feet big and attentive as wolfhounds, flattening the groomed grass in front of the skyscraper, she peered into a third-story window then looked at […]

Moon, Moon, My Honey

By Kellie Wells

  After Dino Buzzati Matilda was tall. Feet big and attentive as wolfhounds, flattening the groomed grass in front of the skyscraper, she peered into a third-story window then looked at […]

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