Winter 2011 • Vol. XXXIII No. 1 Fiction |

Field Guide to Monsters of the Inland Northwest

The Projectionist waved to his wife. She stood in the back corner of the conference room, hidden mostly in shadow. With her normal bashful slowness—a slowness he understood as part of her good-hearted nature—she responded with a thumbs-up sign. Even in shadow, even from across the vast room, he could see that her thumbs were twice as large as his own thumbs, and his heart gave a faint little leap. He had a sudden desire to tell her to flee, as if worried that the growing crowd would soon fall upon her with torches and pitchforks. The speaker approached him and touched his arm. Dr. Roebuck. He had once been a famous podiatrist—as famous as a podiatrist can be, that is—but had left his practice to study giant humanlike footprints found in the Selkirk Mountains, not far from where he lived in Post Falls, Idaho. He had first studied these prints as a skeptic, or so he declared at the many conferences where he spoke, but after months of analysis and fieldwork, he became convi

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History Class

By Michael Downs

The Projectionist waved to his wife. She stood in the back corner of the conference room, hidden mostly in shadow. With her normal bashful slowness—a slowness he understood as part […]

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