Winter 2010 • Vol. XXXII No. 1 NonfictionJanuary 1, 2010 |

Rhetorics of Recognition

On Indigenous Nationhood, Literature, and the Paracolonial Perils of the Nation-State [The greatest specialists of our history] have said that we are only the descendants of the Iroquois…that we have ceased to exist theoretically in 1784, or 1789…that we are now inadequate, somehow…that Indian culture now lies under a glass dome. ---John C Mohawk (Seneca), 1985¹ "It's not only because we took in so many of the surviving whites, afterthings wentto hell forthem," Grandfather Ninekiller said, the only time I ever raised the subject with him. "Clear back in Yuasa [U.S.A.] times, there were lots of mixed-bloods. Toward the end they outnumbered the full-bloods in a lot of tribes. Cherokees damn near screwed ourselves white, in fact, before it was over. How do you think your Grandmother Badwater got that red hair?" "What about you, eduda?" I asked. "Oh, I'm full-blood Cherokee,"

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By Travis J. Tanner

On Indigenous Nationhood, Literature, and the Paracolonial Perils of the Nation-State [The greatest specialists of our history] have said that we are only the descendants of the Iroquois…that we have […]

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