Winter 2006 • Vol. XXVIII No. 1 Writing in Code: Literature and the Genome |

Whale and Bee

Earl called today: another fight with Thelma.Who would doubt it?—evolution wants our marriages unlikely. We're experiments, in search of furtheralloys of the human genome. Fair enough. And yet their sadness seems a brutal price to payfor that. By now—ten years—their daily love is so entangled, it's like hearing that the marbleis at war with its own veins. And lately, any indication of the ways the world is oneholistic organism, melding and dividing in its small parts, is a wonder that surpassesmy ability to comprehend. That "cloud" once meant "a hill"… what was it likewhen they first separated?—one remaining earthbound; and the other in its new life:vapor, whim. There was an ancient time when "melody" and "tragedy" were one.In the nineteenth century, Her Majesty's Navy manufactured a brighter and more durable candleby wedding the heavier oil of the whale to the wax of the bee.

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Albert Goldbarth has been publishing collections of poetry for over four decades, two of which two have received the National Book Critics Circle Award. His latest, Selfish, was published by Graywolf Press in May 2015. He tests his patience by living in Wichita, Kansas.

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Voyage

By Albert Goldbarth

Earl called today: another fight with Thelma.Who would doubt it?—evolution wants our marriages unlikely. We're experiments, in search of furtheralloys of the human genome. Fair enough. And yet their sadness […]

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By Albert Goldbarth

Earl called today: another fight with Thelma.Who would doubt it?—evolution wants our marriages unlikely. We're experiments, in search of furtheralloys of the human genome. Fair enough. And yet their sadness […]

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