Winter 2000 • Vol. XXII No. 1 PoetryJanuary 1, 2000 |

Etymology

The histories of words tell us relationships compose the world; that lens comes from lentils because the first were shaped like the latter; or that money derives from the same word as mint, as in minting coin—words like persons in families who change across generations and yet stay related. I trace my first name to that of a river in Scotland and the people who lived along its banks; my last name, which means little Jacob, carries me back to much earlier beginnings, to heritage from the Greek word for widow, who, even these days, stands first in line for provisions, a word that shows provide is connected to vision, as in foresight, and means to care for one's widow because a husband, a male who dwells in a house, should envision the misfortunes that might destroy his lineage, and so make provision. When I aborted the child (abort means to be born badly), I interrupted the line of persons from that Scottish river and that Hebrew patriarch. I said, at the time, I have no money and d

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Mimesis

By T. R. Hummer

The histories of words tell us relationships compose the world; that lens comes from lentils because the first were shaped like the latter; or that money derives from the same […]

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