Winter 2000 • Vol. XXII No. 1 Nonfiction |

Divine Hunger: A Poetics of Cannibalism

the teeth in love ---Lucretius, De rerum natura You must sit down, sayes Lave, and taste my meat---George Herbert, Love [III] 1. "If a native falls from a tree. . . .he is generally killed and eaten." 2. At sixteen, Saint Augustine stole an armful of pears from a neighboring orchard, though the sin he confessed was not a theft inspired by his taste for pears---they were a shriveled, worm-eaten lot in any case---but an appetite inspired by his taste for sin: "For if any of these fruit entered my mouth, the sweetener of it was my sin in eating." 3. In the story of the Garden, Eve "took of the fruit thereof, and did eat, and gave also unto her husband with her; and he did eat. And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons." But far from satisfying a hunger, their small feast exposed a terrible secret---"the appetite grows by eating"---a secret that eventually c

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the teeth in love ---Lucretius, De rerum natura You must sit down, sayes Lave, and taste my meat---George Herbert, Love [III] 1. "If a native falls from a tree. . […]

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