Winter 1998 • Vol. XX No. 1 Kenyon Review Classics |

The Artificial Nigger

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Flannery O’Connor work that follows is reprinted as it was originally written for The Kenyon Review (Spring 1955). Any departures from current style, spellings, and usage have been left unchanged.   Mr. Head awakened to discover that the room was full of moonlight. He sat up and stared at the floor boards—the color of silver—and then at the ticking on his pillow, which might have been brocade, and after a second, he saw half of the moon five feet away in his shaving mirror. It rolled forward and case a dignifying light on everything. The straight chair against the wall looked stiff and attentive as if it were waiting an order and Mr. Head's trousers, hanging to the back of it, had an almost noble air, like the garment some great man just flung to his servant; but the face on the moon was a grave one. It gazed across the room and out the window where it floated over the horse stall and appeared to contemplate itself with the look of a young man who

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