Winter 1996 • Vol. XVIII No. 1 Nonfiction |

Don Juan, or on Desire

                               from the Polish. I. The royal theater in Madrid is depicted in an engraving from the first decades of the seventeenth century when the Spanish monk Gabriel de Téllez, known as Tirso de Molina, was writing his unbridled comedies, which number close to four hundred. The stage, seen no doubt from a distant gallery, is a small rectangle covered by a roof. Two men are fighting with swords. Two women on opposite sides of the stage are watching the duel, and one seems to be wringing her hands, but the figures are so small that it is difficult to be certain. The theater is at the end of a long courtyard, a corral, and men are standing in the pit, all wearing hats. There are four or five rows of benches directly in front of the stage. The courtyard is between two buildings with balconies attached like honeycombs. All the windows have grates. Such grated windows and balconies still exist today

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Abdication of a Second Cook and Baker

By Richard Dankleff

                               from the Polish. I. The royal theater in Madrid is depicted in an engraving from the first decades of the seventeenth century when the Spanish monk Gabriel de Téllez, known […]

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