Winter 1993 • Vol. XV No. 1 Poetry |

The Bloomingfoods Promise

For the ugly man who buys bell peppers, eats them raw before talking to himself, for the widow who buys prunes because they're tender as lips, for the Saudi who comes wearing a jilaba, his face easing the absence of cultural stigma, his veiled wife behind him telling him what to do for the only time that week, for the red-haired cashier who believes in her beauty, the gorgeous plump blond who shaves neither armpits nor legs, for the day manager who prices apples according to his mood, for the mounds of wilting tofu, the Moroccan olives crispy with sand, the barbecued setan, nori maki, organic tomatoes, four-bean salad, cilantro, Indian frozen foods, for the meatless pâté, endless boxes of couscous and falafel mix, jars of eggless mayonnaise, sacks of whole grain teff, liquid amihos, anise extract, and seaweed crunch, for the biodegradable shampoos, Burmese healing clay, and tiger balm, for all the small compromises you plant in the concrete loam, the wholesomeness you pluck from c

Already have an account? Log in

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.
Khaled Mattawa currently teaches in the graduate creative writing program at the University of Michigan. He is the author of four books of poetry and a critical study of the Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish. Mattawa has coedited two anthologies of Arab American literature and translated many volumes of contemporary Arabic poetry. His awards include the Academy of American Poets Fellowship Prize, the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation, and a MacArthur Fellowship. He is the current editor of Michigan Quarterly Review.

Read More

Buster

By Khaled Mattawa

For the ugly man who buys bell peppers, eats them raw before talking to himself, for the widow who buys prunes because they're tender as lips, for the Saudi who […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.