Winter 1992 • Vol. XIV No. 1 PoetryJanuary 1, 1992 |

Vocation: A Life Suite Based on Four Words from Willa Cather

          1. DESIRE . . . too strong to stop, too sweet to lose . . .         (The Song of the Lark) 1915 It begins in indolence    It begins as a secret intelligence rising like a tune,    opening with the pores    It begins in secret    Thea lies on a rock-shelf, face to the sun,    eyelids closed against sun, the sun roaring    through her ears and pores. Before her a river of . . . air    drops three hundred feet, behind her the cliff-house    —a tawny hollow—clings like a swallow's nest    The rock is smooth and warm and above all clean    The rock is above all clean    The Ancient People left no wounds on the earth    but a curious aspiration—a carbon stain    on the rock-roof above a cookfire, turkey bones,    the shard of a pot with a serpent's head in red,    a black water jar    where a woman blazed identical pale cliff-h

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Clementene

By Jane Cooper

          1. DESIRE . . . too strong to stop, too sweet to lose . . .         (The Song of the Lark) 1915 It begins in indolence    It begins as a secret […]

How Can I Speak for Her?

By Jane Cooper

          1. DESIRE . . . too strong to stop, too sweet to lose . . .         (The Song of the Lark) 1915 It begins in indolence    It begins as a secret […]

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