Winter 1992 • Vol. XIV No. 1 Nonfiction |

Remembering Henri Coulette

When the poet Henri Coulette died in 1988 at the age of sixty, he left approximately 150 poems and half a dozen close friends. His first book, The War of the Secret Agents, was the Lamont Poetry Selection of 1965, while the second, The Family Goldschmitt, won critical praise when it appeared in 1971. What would have been his third volume, And Come to Closure, was in manuscript form at the time of his death and is now part of his recently published collected works. Henri's gift for poetry was matched by his gift for friendship. To be allowed to know this most private of men was to discover an extraordinary wealth of sensitivity, generosity, and wit. Knowing him also meant being known—sometimes more acutely than was comfortable—and being treated with the utmost understanding and consideration. The loss of such a friend is irreplaceable. "Without him I walk with a limp," one of his oldest friends said recently. So do all of us who knew him. That I had the privilege of being

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When the poet Henri Coulette died in 1988 at the age of sixty, he left approximately 150 poems and half a dozen close friends. His first book, The War of […]

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