Winter 1991 • Vol. XIII No. 1 NonfictionJanuary 1, 1991 |

In Other Words: Gardening for Love: The Work of the Essayist

IN OTHER WORDS: GARDENING FOR LOVE—THE WORK OF THE ESSAYIST God Almighty first planted a garden. And Indeed it is the purest of human pleasures.                               BACON If you would know the power of character, see how much you would impoverish the world, if you could take clean out of history the life of Milton, of Shakespeare, of Plato,— these three, and cause them not to be. See you not, instantly, how much less the power of man would be? I console myself in the poverty of my present thoughts, in the paucity of great men, in the malignity and dullness of nations, by falling back on these sublime recollections, and seeing what the prolific soul could beget on actual nature;—seeing what Plato was, and Shakespeare, and Milton,—three irrefragable facts. Then I dare; I also will essay to be.                           EMERSON, Essays

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Play and Cultural Differences

By Paul B. Armstrong

IN OTHER WORDS: GARDENING FOR LOVE—THE WORK OF THE ESSAYIST God Almighty first planted a garden. And Indeed it is the purest of human pleasures.                               BACON If you would know the […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.