Winter 1991 • Vol. XIII No. 1 FictionJanuary 1, 1991 |

Geller’s Last Chance

Doctor Advocate Arthur Geller needed a cleaning woman. What use was it to him now that he had led the Belsen survivors in negotiations with the British generals? Who remembered the French car and the immense Russian leather coat he had shown off when he turned up in Jerusalem like Sam Goldwyn in 1948? The kids who played with spent shells under the bullet-scarred DANGER BORDER signs near his house called him Mr. Nodaddy because he was the only bearded man they knew who had no family. What he did have was a pair of red emphatic cheeks and redder hands, a wiry, pointed Hapsburg beard, and a hoarse, reedy voice which sang out basic Hebrew in zigzaggy Hungarian cadences. And, of course, he had a house, a crumbling box of a villa right by No-Man's-Land over at the end of the little Jerusalem suburb where the bus turned round and the barbed wire took over. Geller really needed a cleaning woman. The dark and lofty rooms he lived in stank of sweat and kerosene. His collection of German r

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Elena

By Devon Jersild

Doctor Advocate Arthur Geller needed a cleaning woman. What use was it to him now that he had led the Belsen survivors in negotiations with the British generals? Who remembered […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.