Winter 1989 • Vol. XI No. 1 Special Anniversary Feature: Excerpts from the War YearsJanuary 1, 1989 |

War and Publication

From the Spring 1942 issue. The announcement in the Southern Review's winter issue of the suspension of that quarterly need not be mentioned in the same breath with Pearl Harbor, yet in the total perspective it was an evil portent. The periodical had not quite completed its seventh volume. It had been a sumptuous publication in its physical aspect, and almost jaunty in the bravery of its critical position, symbolic of a certain splendor in the peace-time literary effort of this country. In the absence of detailed reasons for the withdrawal of its financial support, it may be supposed that its discontinuance is one of the early casualties of war. For the setting of the finest discussion of dramatic art to be found in English, the famous Essay of Dryden's, we have a dialogue movingly staged within hearing of the guns. With battle waging at the river's mouth between the Dutch and English fleets, Londoners find the afternoon suspense unendurable. Like many other patriotic picni

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Muses and Amazons

By John Crowe Ransom

From the Spring 1942 issue. The announcement in the Southern Review's winter issue of the suspension of that quarterly need not be mentioned in the same breath with Pearl Harbor, […]

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