Winter 1989 • Vol. XI No. 1 Nonfiction |

Postmodernist Allegory and the Denial of Nature

The term postmodernism, so widely accepted as the appropriate designation of that stylistic, theoretical, social, political, and economic era in which we now find ourselves, is nevertheless as ambivalent in respect to exact definition as to implied valuation. Does postmodernism mean innovation or decadence? Do the artistic works it describes signal fresh perspectives and premises, or constitute the symptomology of a capitalist culture in decline? Are its differences from the preceding modernism, which itself succeeded romanticism (that lineage, at least, is commonly agreed upon), solutions to modernist quandaries, or are they more extreme versions of modernist strategies—avant-garde disavowals of the past through radical formalities or skeptical analyses, for example? Postmodernism may be first identified clearly in the American Pop art of the 1960s. Modernism had been recognized in part by the separation of a private subjectivity from the public, urban commercial world seen a

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The Snow’s Code

By James Applewhite

The term postmodernism, so widely accepted as the appropriate designation of that stylistic, theoretical, social, political, and economic era in which we now find ourselves, is nevertheless as ambivalent in […]

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