Winter 1987 • Vol. IX No. 1 NonfictionJanuary 1, 1987 |

Caliban, Again

You taught me language, and my profit on't Is, I know how to curse. The red plague rid you For learning me your language. CALIBAN IN The Tempest, I.ii.363-365 Since the Renaissance, and increasingly in the twentieth century, Europeans have shared, if not in some respects surpassed, American interests in the American Indian as the new/old "free" peoples of the Western World. D. H. Lawrence came to New Mexico to relocate among Pueblo Indians in the twenties, a move emblematic of Euroamerican migrations for three centuries; this godson of Raleigh went back to Italy and published Mornings in Mexico (1927) and died before he could write more from his fascination with the "native" American. Lawrence's ashes lie in the Taos mountains today. Ezra Pound, W. C. Williams, H. D. and the Imagists rediscovered American Indian visual and verbal arts through the insistences of Mary Austin, midwife to modern primitivism; their contemporary nativism culminated four centuries of Western org

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The Pressed Melodeon

By Ben Howard

You taught me language, and my profit on't Is, I know how to curse. The red plague rid you For learning me your language. CALIBAN IN The Tempest, I.ii.363-365 Since […]

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