Winter 1982 • Vol. IV No. 1 NonfictionJanuary 1, 1982 |

Double Visions: Olympic Games and American Culture

In one way or another, at one time or another, to one degree or another, nearly everyone cares about the Olympics. In scarcely eighty years the Games have grown from a fin-de-siècle curiosity into an international culture performance of global proportion. Participants in an Olympic Games—athletes, officials, dignitaries, press, technicians, support personnel; and artists, performers, scientists, and world youth campers attending ancillary events—now number in the tens of thousands and are drawn from as many as 130 nations. Two or three million persons, many journeying from afar, watch the events live, and the broadcast audience is staggering. According to reasonable estimates, 1.5 billion people—approximately one out of every three persons then alive on the earth—watched or listened to part of the proceedings at Montreal in 1976. Adding a "guesstimate" of the newspaper audience and of those interested in the Games but prevented by political censure or lack of technical faci

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Autobiography Now

By Rockwell Gray

In one way or another, at one time or another, to one degree or another, nearly everyone cares about the Olympics. In scarcely eighty years the Games have grown from […]

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