Winter 1982 • Vol. IV No. 1 PoetryJanuary 1, 1982 |

Deborah in Ancient Lingerie, in Thin Oak over Creek

Having found out this morning I was born Born to be hung Low down in the braced weave of plants   I can do  I can cling Beginning to be the all Of the strain of trail-blazing a circle Over water, I can do           tanager- glimmer             glimmer and shoot Red like a bolt I can do  and any but completely Buck-naked diving I can do In my album bloomers:                         a live twig flimmering back Across the eyeball                           on the way up, and make it strike and spark Tears and no brain- sweat but a close-out of wings over down- driven midstreaming rocks   I can do: a praying enlargement Of shadow I can do, and run it up a tree: An unparallelled cutting of the sense   Of time from around me, I can do — a salamander's circular nightmare Of renewal by fire, I can make Of common sunlight, by cli

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In 1956, James Dickey resigned his teaching position at The University of Florida when his reading of the poem "The Father's Body" to a local women's group was construed as obscene. He took a position as an advertising copywriter and executive for the McCann-Erickson agency in New York, a position he later described as "selling his soul to the devil in the daytime and buying it back at night." Dickey worked in the advertising business until 1961, when he received a Guggenheim Fellowship that allowed him to move his family to Italy and devote his time to writing poetry.

Read More

Ray-Flowers: I

By James Dickey

Having found out this morning I was born Born to be hung Low down in the braced weave of plants   I can do  I can cling Beginning to be the all […]

Ray-Flowers: II

By James Dickey

Having found out this morning I was born Born to be hung Low down in the braced weave of plants   I can do  I can cling Beginning to be the all […]

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