Winter 1981 • Vol. III No. 1 Fiction |

The End of the Week

George and Jenine Perrault had been married for a year and a half. He was forty-eight and she forty. Both had been widowed after ten years of marriage and both had remained single for a number of years afterwards. Until he had met Jenine, George had nearly given up the idea of remarrying. With other women he had found it a strain to put himself forward as a man a woman might want to marry; he couldn't quite figure out what he was supposed to do or say. But with Jenine things just happened, effortlessly. During the many late evenings they spent together talking about themselves, about their pasts mostly, he felt his old way of being with a woman—his mild wit and controlled liveliness—return; he was coming alive again. Jenine was pretty, experienced, well-spoken, and kind—the sort of woman George had always admired but never expected to possess. It had never seemed his fate to marry someone like Jenine. After their marriage, George and Jenine each sold the houses they had be

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Ellen’s

By Albert Goldbarth

George and Jenine Perrault had been married for a year and a half. He was forty-eight and she forty. Both had been widowed after ten years of marriage and both […]

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