Winter 1981 • Vol. III No. 1 Poetry |

Marginal Employment

The Duc de Berry usually wore a robe the color of the Mediterranean, and listed two pots of salts of cobalt along with apes and dromedaries, a tooth of Charlemagne, another from a narwhal, and a charred snippet from the mantle of the prophet, among his choicest curios. Though unacquainted with the works of Marx, he added value to the hours of no one knows how many lapidarists, couturiers, embroiderers of passementerie with gilt and pearls, and wielders in gold leaf of the minutest marginal punctilio. The progress of his Très Riches Heures is burdened with a fossil gilding not only of the lily but also of the even finer flower of the grass, which goes clothed nowadays in common purple—nerve-nets of tressed fertility, marginal fan-vaultings scintillating with a sequin rain: out of what matrix of pounded relics, what impastos' thickened blood and mire, the scandal of such squandered ornament, no less than any artifice uniquely crafted for an emperor's enjoyment, escapes our

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In 1983, at the age of sixty-three, Amy Clampitt published her first full-length collection, The Kingfisher (Alfred A. Knopf). In the decade that followed, Clampitt published five books of poetry, including What the Light Was Like (Alfred A. Knopf, 1985), Archaic Figure (Alfred A. Knopf, 1987), and Westward (Alfred A. Knopf, 1990). Her last book, A Silence Opens (Alfred A. Knopf), appeared in 1994. The recipient in 1982 of a Guggenheim Fellowship, and in 1984 of an Academy Fellowship, she was made a MacArthur Foundation Fellow in 1992.

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Olympia

By Amy Clampitt

The Duc de Berry usually wore a robe the color of the Mediterranean, and listed two pots of salts of cobalt along with apes and dromedaries, a tooth of Charlemagne, […]

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