Winter 1980 • Vol. II No. 1 FictionJanuary 1, 1980 |

The Youngest Doll

Translated from the Spanish.   The old aunt had taken her rocking chair out onto the balcony overlooking the cane fields very early as she always did whenever she awoke with the urge to make a doll. As a young girl she used to bathe in the river quite often, but one day when the rain had swollen the current into the lash of a dragon's tail, she had felt a soft feeling of melting snow in the marrow of her bones. Her head submerged in the dark echo chamber of the rocks, she thought she had heard, mingled with the sound of the water, the salt bursts on the faraway beach and felt that her hair had poured out into the sea at last. Precisely at that moment she felt a terrible bite on her calf. They pulled her screaming out of the water and carried her back to the house writhing with pain on a stretcher. The doctor who examined her assured them that it was nothing; she'd most likely been bitten by a vicious river prawn. Days went by, however, and the wound refused to heal. After a

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

The Shallowest Man

By Woody Allen

Translated from the Spanish.   The old aunt had taken her rocking chair out onto the balcony overlooking the cane fields very early as she always did whenever she awoke […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.